Frequently Asked Questions

FAQs

Have you ever had a question and either didn't know where to find the answer or were too afraid to ask? If so, you've come to the right place.

This section is a compilation of answers to the questions our clients commonly ask along with our reply. Start by following one of the links below.

  1. At what resolution should I save my photos and graphics?
  2. How do I go about getting an estimate from you?
  3. How long does it take for you to complete my order?
  4. Is white considered a printing color?
  5. Tips on how to save your design files
  6. What are the comparative advantages of producing my job on your duplicating devices versus producing them on your presses?
  7. What file format should I use when submitting my electronic document for printing?
  8. What is a "proof"?
  9. What is the Pantone Matching System?
  10. What type of products and services do you provide?
  11. Why do the printed colors look different from the colors on my screen?
  1. At what resolution should I save my photos and graphics?

    Resolution should be set to 300 dpi.

    Pictures and graphics pulled from the internet are often low resolution, typically 72 dpi or 96 dpi. Avoid these graphics, as they will appear pixilated and blocky when printed.

    Also note that you should save all photos in CMYK mode, not RGB mode when possible. Images saved in RGB mode may not print properly. If you are unable to save your image in CYMK mode, please let us know.

  2. How do I go about getting an estimate from you?

    Well, since you are here, we would suggest you use our online estimate request form. Otherwise, the best way to ensure that we get all the information necessary to do an accurate quote, give us a call and talk with one of our customer service representatives. The number is 262-502-4270 and the hours are (CST) 8 - 5 Monday through Friday

  3. How long does it take for you to complete my order?

    Because every job is unique unto itself and is only limited by the imagination and skill of it's creator, it is impossible to give a blanket answer to this question. But we do strive to have proofs out in 24 hours from the time we receive the order. Once the client has the proof, the timing then becomes something they have more control over than we do. The teams we have here at Litho-Craft in our production control and customer service areas are constantly monitoring our workflow by following up on projects we have in house and making sure nothing gets left behind.

  4. Is white considered a printing color?

    Not typically. Because white is the default color of paper, it is simply recognized as the absence of any ink. However, when using colored paper, white ink may be used if any text or graphic requires it.

  5. Tips on how to save your design files

    Make them print ready and acceptable for us to print.

    COREL DRAW:
    Saving your Corel Draw file as an Adobe Illustrator EPS
    • Embed all Images
    • Convert all your text/copy to outline fonts
    • Export as Illustrator EPS

    FREEHAND:
    • Embed all Images
    • Convert all your text/copy to paths
    • Export as Illustrator EPS or PDF

    PAGEMAKER:
    Saving your PageMaker file as an EPS
    • Embed all Images
    • Convert all your text/copy to outline fonts
    • Export your file as an EPS using the below settings:
    Postscript Level 2
    CMYK Mode
    TIFF format and
    Binary

    PUBLISHER:
    You will need to have the full version of Adobe Acrobat PDF. If you don’t please download and use our Adobe Job Ready Program. If you do have the full version of Adobe Acrobat PDF please follow the steps below.
    Under File, Print, select Adobe PDF writer
    Under Properties select Press Quality and Save your PDF

  6. What are the comparative advantages of producing my job on your duplicating devices versus producing them on your presses?

    The advantages of our duplicating devices are best realized on runs of 1000 or less for black and white copy with a minimum of emphisis on halftones or screens. sf the piece included photos or halftone screens the copy quality would be lower than that achieved by the printing process. With our color Xerox Docu 12 we can produce extrememly clean and crisp color copies . This is your best option on short runs of under 500. On longer runs or when screens or halftones require higher quality, offset printing would be the best alternative. For that we have our Heidelburg Quicmaster DI-4 color press. This offset press uses a waterless process with standard inks, not toner. The press uses CTP technology (computer to plate) allowing turnaround almost as fast as copying!

  7. What file format should I use when submitting my electronic document for printing?

    PDF (Portable Document Format) is the most common and preferred file format for submitting digital documents. With the installation of a PDF print driver on your computer, virtually any program can generate a PDF file suitable for printing. Both commercial and free PDF print drivers are available online for download from different sources.

  8. What is a "proof"?

    A proof is a way of ensuring that we have set your type accurately or received your files correctly and that everything is according to your requirements. Typically, we will produce a proof which will be sent to you online. Of course, if your schedule allows, we can provide a hard copy proof also.
    On multiple color jobs that run on the Heidelberg Quickmaster press we will produce a color proof on our Xerox Docu 12 to show approximately how the different colors will appear.

    If the 4 color piece is to run conventionaly, we will produce a matchprint from the films.

  9. What is the Pantone Matching System?

    The Pantone Matching System (PMS) is a color reproduction standard in which colors all across the spectrum are each identified by a unique, independent number. The use of PMS allows us to precisely match colors and maintain color consistency throughout the printing process.

  10. Good question! We are a full service shop and offer a wide range of products and services. To see a full listing and description of what we can offer you, check out the Products & Services area in the Customer Service Section of our website.

  11. Why do the printed colors look different from the colors on my screen?

    In short, printers and monitors produce colors in different ways.

    Monitors use the RGB (red, green, blue) color model, which usually supports a wider spectrum of colors. Printers use the CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow, black) color model, which can reproduce most—but not all—of the colors in the RGB color model. Depending on the equipment used, CMYK generally matches 85–90% of the colors in the RGB model.

    When a color is selected from the RGB model that is out of the range of the CMYK model, the application chooses what it thinks is the closest color that will match. Programs like Adobe Photoshop will allow you to choose which color will be replaced. Others may not.